STD


Basic Std Test oackage

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are infections that are passed from one person to another through sexual contact. The causes of STDs are bacteria, parasites, yeast, and viruses. There are more than 20 types of STDs, including Chlamydia, Genital herpes, Gonorrhea, HIV/AIDS, HPV, Syphilis and Trichomoniasis.Most STDs affect both men and women, but in many cases the health problems they cause can be more severe for women. If a pregnant woman has an STD, it can cause serious health problems for the baby.Antibiotics can treat STDs caused by bacteria, yeast, or parasites. There is no cure for STDs caused by a virus, but medicines can often help with the symptoms and keep the disease under control.

Chlamydia

Chlamydia is a bacterial infection that’s easily cured with antibiotic medicine. It’s one of the most common STDs, and most people who have chlamydia don’t show any symptoms.
Want to get tested for chlamydia? Visit or contact us
Chlamydia is a SUPER common bacterial infection that you can get from sexual contact with another person. Close to 3 million Americans get it  every year, most commonly among 14-24-year-olds. Chlamydia is spread through vaginal, anal, and oral sex. The infection is carried in semen (cum), pre-cum, and vaginal fluids. Chlamydia can infect the penis, vagina, cervix, anus, urethra, eyes, and throat. Most people with chlamydia don’t have any symptoms and feel totally fine, so they might not even know they’re infected. Chlamydia can be easily cleared up with antibiotics. But if you don’t treat chlamydia, it may lead to major health problems in the future. That’s why STD testing is so important — the sooner you know you have chlamydia, the faster you can cure it. Chlamydia is usually spread during sexual contact with someone who has the infection. It can happen even if no one cums. The main ways people get chlamydia are from having vaginal sex and anal sex, but it can also be spread through oral sex. Rarely, you can get chlamydia by touching your eye if you have infected fluids on your hand. Chlamydia can also be spread to a baby during birth if the mother has it.Chlamydia isn’t spread through casual contact, so you CAN’T get chlamydia from sharing food or drinks, kissing, hugging, holding hands, coughing, sneezing, or sitting on the toilet.

Syphilis

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by bacteria. It infects the genital area, lips, mouth, or anus of both men and women. You usually get syphilis from sexual contact with someone who has it. It can also pass from mother to baby during pregnancy.
The early stage of syphilis usually causes a single, small, painless sore. Sometimes it causes swelling in nearby lymph nodes. If you do not treat it, syphilis usually causes a non-itchy skin rash, often on your hands and feet. Many people do not notice symptoms for years. Symptoms can go away and come back.
The sores caused by syphilis make it easier to get or give someone HIV during sex. If you are pregnant, syphilis can cause birth defects, or you could lose your baby. In rare cases, syphilis causes serious health problems and even death.
Lab tests can tell if you have the infection, visit or contact us.
Syphilis is easy to cure with antibiotics if you catch it early.

HPV

Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are a group of related viruses. They can cause warts on different parts of your body. There are more than 200 types. About 40 of those types affect the genitals. They are spread through sexual contact with an infected partner. Some of those can put you at risk for cancer.
There are two categories of sexually-transmitted HPV. Low-risk HPV can cause genital warts. High-risk HPV can cause various cancers: cervical cancer, anal cancer, some types of oral and throat cancer, vulvar cancer, vaginal cancer, penile cancer.
HPV infections are the most common sexually transmitted infections in the United States. Anyone who has ever been sexually active can get HPV, but you are more likely to get it if you have had many sex partners or have had sex with someone who has had many partners. Because it is so common, most people get HPV infections shortly after becoming sexually active for the first time.
Some people develop genital warts from HPV infection, but others have no symptoms. Most high-risk HPV infections go away within 1 to 2 years and do not cause cancer. Some HPV infections, however, can persist for many years. Those infections can lead to cell changes that, if not treated, may become cancerous.
In women, Pap tests can detect changes in the cervix that might lead to cancer. Pap tests, along with HPV tests, are used in cervical cancer screening. Visit or contact us. Vaccines can protect against several types of HPV, including some that can cause cancer.

HIV/AIDS

HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. It harms your immune system by destroying the white blood cells that fight infection. This puts you at risk for serious infections and certain cancers. AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. It is the final stage of infection with HIV. Not everyone with HIV develops AIDS.
HIV most often spreads through unprotected sex with an infected person. It may also spread by sharing drug needles or through contact with the blood of an infected person. Women can give it to their babies during pregnancy or childbirth.
The first signs of HIV infection may be swollen glands and flu-like symptoms. These may come and go within two to four weeks. Severe symptoms may not appear until months or years later.
HIV Testing: a blood test can tell if you have HIV infection. Visit or contact us.
There is no cure, but there are many medicines that fight HIV infection and lower the risk of infecting others. People who get early treatment can live with the disease for a long time.

Gonorrhea

Gonorrhea is a sexually transmitted disease. It is most common in young adults. The bacteria that cause gonorrhea can infect the genital tract, mouth, or anus. You can get gonorrhea during vaginal, oral, or anal sex with an infected partner. A pregnant woman can pass it to her baby during childbirth.
Gonorrhea does not always cause symptoms. In men, gonorrhea can cause pain when urinating and discharge from the penis. If untreated, it can cause problems with the prostate and testicles.
In women, the early symptoms of gonorrhea often are mild. Later, it can cause bleeding between periods, pain when urinating, and increased discharge from the vagina. If untreated, it can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease, which causes problems with pregnancy and infertility. Gonorrhea is diagnosed with lab tests, visit or contact us.
Treatment is with antibiotics. Treating gonorrhea is becoming more difficult because drug-resistant strains are increasing.

Genital Herpes

Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by a herpes simplex virus (HSV). It can cause sores on your genital or rectal area, buttocks, and thighs. You can get it from having vaginal, anal, or oral sex with someone who has it. The virus can spread even when sores are not present. Mothers can also infect their babies during childbirth.
Symptoms of herpes are called outbreaks. You usually get sores near the area where the virus has entered the body. The sores are blisters which break and become painful, and then heal. Sometimes people do not know they have herpes because they have no symptoms or very mild symptoms. The virus can be more serious in newborn babies or in people with weak immune systems.

Repeat outbreaks are common, especially during the first year. Over time, you get them less often and the symptoms become milder. The virus stays in your body for life. There are tests that can diagnose genital herpes. Visit or contact us. There is no cure. How ever, medicines can help lessen symptoms, decrease outbreaks, and lower the risk of passing the virus to others

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Trichomoniasis

Trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by a parasite. You get it through sexual intercourse with an infected partner. Many people do not have any symptoms. If you do get symptoms, they usually happen within 5 to 28 days after being infected. It can cause vaginitis in women. Symptoms include , yellow-green or gray discharge from the vagina, discomfort during sex, vaginal odor, painful urination, itching in or near the vagina.
Most men do not have symptoms. If they do, they may have a whitish discharge from the penis and painful or difficult urination and ejaculation. Lab tests can tell if you have the infection, visit or contact us.
Treatment is with antibiotics. If you are infected, you and your partner must be treated.
NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
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